Ferro Alloys

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    Ferro Silicon

    Ferrosilicon is a ferroalloy, an alloy of iron and silicon with an average silicon content between 15 and 90 weight percent. It contains a high proportion of iron silicides. Ferrosilicon is used for manufacture of silicon, corrosion-resistant and high-temperature resistant ferrous silicon alloys, and silicon steel for electromotors and transformer cores. In the manufacture of cast iron, ferrosilicon is used for inoculation of the iron to accelerate graphitization. In arc welding, ferrosilicon can be found in some electrode coatings. Ferrosilicon is used as a source of silicon to reduce metals from their oxides and to deoxidize steel and other ferrous alloys. This prevents the loss of carbon from the molten steel (so called blocking the heat). Ferro Silicon is used in the production of cast iron, as Ferro Silicon can accelerate graphitization. Ferro Silicon replaces the need for ferro manganese, spiegeleisen and calcium silicides in the manufacturing process.
    1,020.00  1,010.00 
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    Ferro Silico Manganese

    Silicon manganese is a chemical compound made by mixing natural silicon with manganese, an element found naturally in the earth. When combined, these elements can be used to produce a number of specialty steel alloys. Silico manganese enhances the natural properties of steel, giving it increased strength and function, as well as improved aesthetic appeal. This means that silicon manganese alloys can be used in applications beyond those associated with standard steel products. Silicon manganese may also be known as ferro silico manganese or abbreviated as FeSiMn. Silico Manganese may be used alone, or combined with other substances to create various alloys. The ratio of silicon to manganese can also be adjusted to give steel the desired properties. Standard silicon manganese steel alloys contain 14 to 16 percent silicon, and as much as 68 percent manganese. They also include small amounts of carbon, which is required for the steel to undergo a chemical reactions with these compounds. In stainless or specialty steel products, the silicon content can be as high as 30 percent.
    970.00  965.00 
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    Ferro Chrome

    Ferrochrome is an alloy of chromium and iron containing between 50% and 70% chromium. The ferrochrome is produced by electric arc melting of chromite, an iron magnesium chromium oxide and the most important chromium ore. Most of the world's ferrochrome is produced in South Africa, Kazakhstan and India, which have large domestic chromite resources. Increasing amounts are coming from Russia and China. The production of steel is the largest consumer of ferrochrome, especially the production of stainless steel with chromium content of 10 to 20% is the main application of ferrochrome.
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    Low Carbon Ferro Manganese

    Manganese is the twelfth most abundant metal found within the Earth’s crust and derives its name from the Latin word Magnes which means Magnet. It is the fourth most used metal in terms of quantity behind iron, aluminium and copper. It was first used in the steel industry in Ancient Greece, the presence of manganese in the iron ore is most likely the reason that the weapons made by the Spartans were superior to their enemies. It was first isolated and recognised as an element in 1771 by a Swedish chemist called Scheele. Approximately 90% of all manganese consumed worldwide goes into the steel industry as an alloying element, and because of its relatively low price and technical benefits it has no real substitute. Apart from its uses in industry, trace amounts of manganese are very important to good health. It makes bones strong but flexible and it aids the body in absorbing Vitamin B12. It also acts as an important activator for the body to use enzymes. Manganese also has important uses in aluminium as an alloying element. It is a versatile addition to copper alloys and its largest non-metal application is in the form of portable dry batteries. It also has chemical applications and is used as a ceramic and brick colourant. Widespread use of manganese in steel making began in the UK and France at the beginning of the 19th Century. At the time it was noted that manganese increased the hardness of iron without a reduction in its malleability or toughness. In modern steelmaking manganese is added in the form of manganese alloys because of its sulphur fixing, deoxidising and alloying properties. Nearly all steels contain some manganese, in proportions that vary from 0.05% to as high as 12%. There are numerous grades of steel each requiring a different amount of manganese. The average consumption of manganese is approximately 7-10kgs of manganese per ton of steel. Ferro Manganese is produced by reduction of Manganese Oxide in blast furnaces or electric furnaces. It is a very flexible process in that the slags can be reprocessed into Ferro Silico Manganese which in turn can be further refined into Medium and Low Carbon Ferro Manganese. Ferro Manganese was invented in 1860 by Sir Henry Bessemer as a way to add Manganese during steel making with the advantage that a combination of Iron and Manganese Oxide results in a lower melting point for the alloy Ferro Manganese compared to pure Manganese Oxide. Standard Ferro Manganese (or High Carbon Ferro Manganese) is a commonly used alloy produced by the reduction of manganese ore in the presence of carbon. Typically it contains 75% manganese and 7% carbon. Worldwide production of Ferro Manganese in 2008 was approximately 4.5 million tons, with China being the worlds largest producer.
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    Medium Carbon Ferro Manganese

    Manganese alloys are mostly used in steelmaking and foundry activities. Some 30 % of the manganese used today in steelmaking is still used for its properties as a deoxidant and a sulphide former. In this last case it combines with sulphur avoiding the formation of iron sulphides, which sulphides are low melting point phases which become liquid at hot rolling temperatures and which, consequently, generate surface cracking. The other 70% of the manganese is used purely as an alloying element. Steels usually contain from 0,2% to 2% manganese depending on grades as manganese is the cheapest alloying element among those which enhance some key mechanical properties like strength and toughness. In the specific case of stainless steel it can substitute expensive nickel in some austenitic grades called 200 series. There are two families of manganese alloys called ferro-manganese (FeMn) and silico-manganese (SiMn). Silicomanganese adds additional silicon which is a stronger deoxidant. Nitrogen, boron, titanium, phosphorus are elements which can be controlled depending on requested specification. A very specific application of refined manganese alloys is a constituent in the coating of welding electrodes.  
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    High Carbon Ferro Manganese

    Manganese alloys are mostly used in steelmaking and foundry activities. Some 30 % of the manganese used today in steelmaking is still used for its properties as a deoxidant and a sulphide former. In this last case it combines with sulphur avoiding the formation of iron sulphides, which sulphides are low melting point phases which become liquid at hot rolling temperatures and which, consequently, generate surface cracking. The other 70% of the manganese is used purely as an alloying element. Steels usually contain from 0,2% to 2% manganese depending on grades as manganese is the cheapest alloying element among those which enhance some key mechanical properties like strength and toughness. In the specific case of stainless steel it can substitute expensive nickel in some austenitic grades called 200 series. There are two families of manganese alloys called ferro-manganese (FeMn) and silico-manganese (SiMn). Silicomanganese adds additional silicon which is a stronger deoxidant. Nitrogen, boron, titanium, phosphorus are elements which can be controlled depending on requested specification. A very specific application of refined manganese alloys is a constituent in the coating of welding electrodes.
    1,430.00  1,410.00